Roundup: ChinaTel, MVNO, Anatel

- Monday, April 4, 2011

Roundup: ChinaTel, MVNO, Anatel

ChinaTel has the potential to become a major operator in Peru through its PeruSat venture, and helped by partnerships with equipment manufacturer ZTE and ownership of backhaul provider Sino Crossing, consultancy Frost & Sullivan said in a statement.

In March 2009, ChinaTel acquired PeruSat, which holds a license to build high-speed wireless broadband systems. For the network rollout, phase one encompasses Peru's seven most populated cities except Lima. Phase two includes Lima and Callao, and phase three will cover the rest of the country.

Frost & Sullivan highlighted the potential in Peru, citing World Bank figures showing that the country's internet usage rose from 10% in 2003 to 25% in 2008.

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The consultancy said that by owning 51% in Sino Crossing, ChinaTel does not have to pay other service providers for backhaul. Meanwhile, the partnership with ZTE allows them to deploy upgradable and scalable technology platforms.

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Colombia's national planning department (DNP) will hold a conference on April 12-14 in which it will study the technical, economic and market conditions for implementing mobile virtual network operators (MVNO) in the country, according to a DNP statement.

Invited to the forum will be a range of players in the telecoms sector, including mobile operators and government representatives.

In January, Miami-based consultancy Imobix won an IDB-sponsored contract to carry out technical, legal and economic feasibility studies for MVNOs.

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Brazilian telecommunications regulator Anatel has authorized Apple's iPad 2 - both the WiFi and 3G versions - for sale in the country, the watchdog reported.

Even with a permit for sales, Apple has reportedly said there is no prospect of releasing the tablet soon in Brazil. The tablet was launched on March 2 in the US after the first version of the product sold 15mn devices worldwide.

In Latin America, Mexico began selling the device on March 25.